Archive: Month: January 2016


7reasonsDo you think a disaster won’t happen to you? Or, do you think it might, but there’s nothing you can do? This article is for you and anyone else needing a reason to be prepared for disaster! Would you like to print this list? Here you go!

 

1. Save Money

Save moneyYes, you can save money by being prepared. If you understand your community’s greatest risks, you can take steps to make your home and property more resistant. For example, you may qualify for a reduced insurance rate if your home and property are resistant to damage from weather-related or other types of disasters. You may also have fewer damages to repair if disaster does strike. What risks do you face? Enter your ZIP code to find out on DisasterSafety.org (scroll down to Discover the risks you face).   Check with your county or parish Emergency Management Agency for local specifics, and then take action to save money by being prepared.


2. Recover Faster

asterThinking through what you’ll do and recording those steps in your family disaster plan (see reason # 7) make it easier for you to recover after a disaster hits. For example, does everyone in your household know what to do if a flash flood is about to affect your home and property?

3. Avoid or Reduce Damage

3Look around your home and property. What can you do to reduce potential damage from a disaster? You can strengthen your house structure to protect against a shift from flood or wind forces, develop a firewise landscape, take steps to prevent home fires, and take other actions to make your home and property more secure.

4. Keep in Touch with Family

4Be sure that each family member’s cell phone includes emergency and family phone numbers. Teach everyone to text message. During an emergency, it may be easier to contact others via text message than it is via a call. Also keep an up-to-date paper list of key phone numbers. If power is out and your cell phone is not charged, you will still be able to locate a needed phone number. It’s easier to contact relatives during a disaster if you’ve created a contact list before the disaster. They’ll want to know that you’re okay, so have a plan for notifying them. That plan may include contacting a designated out-of-state relative or friend who will let others know your status. You might also use the American Red Cross Safe and  Well website.


5. Survive on your Own

5This is where emergency kits come in handy. No matter where you are, it may be a while before emergency responders can reach you. Here’s a starting list for your household supply kit.

6. Retain Important Papers

6Financial records, property records, legal records, and family records are important to you and your family. But are they filed and stored so you can easily find the important papers after a disaster—or when you’re evacuating? These papers will make it easier for you to recover. Here are some tips on organizing, managing, and accessing your papers.

7. Avoid Panic

7Create a family disaster plan. Having a plan can help your family make it through any disaster with minimal stress. A comprehensive family disaster plan includes information about each family member, household pets, insurance and finances, and the home itself and its contents. Most important, the plan outlines what each family member should do during an emergency and identifies safe places inside and outside the home. Here’s a family disaster plan template from the University of Missouri Extension.

What are some reasons you have found for being prepared for disaster?


 

And here’s a pin for you, too.

7disaster_long


 Pat Skinner, EDEN web manager, is blog post author.

CLIMB HIGH (2)

The networking support team at LSU is pleased to have Debbie Hurlbert putting her energy into these two important growth areas, working primarily with the Information Clearinghouse Committee and the youth-focused members of EDEN’s Family and Consumer Science/4-H Youth PAWG. If you’ve been to either of the last two EDEN Annual Meetings you’ll remember Debbie as the person behind the 4-H youth
themselves presenting their mitigation program in Alabama (a first youth presence at an EDEN Annual meeting), and helping to convene a small youth programs group in Las Cruces, to see if the recent surge in youth programs is sustainable, and warrants a separate PAWG. As a result of that meeting EDEN now has a Youth and Disasters Pinterest board. The board can be found at https://www.pinterest.com/edenpins/youth-and-disasters/.

What YOU can do to help EDEN work better for you

Here are two things you can do!

The first thing you can do.

If you have youth-audience programs and educational/exercise/training materials, make sure Debbie knows about them. She has already scoured the past annual meeting agendas and found quite a bit, but we know there’s more going on than we hear about at these meetings. She reached out to Lynette Black, Ryan Akers and Susan Kerr, who have submitted a proposal for PILD. She’s even started posting in EDEN’s Youth and Disasters Pinterest channel. You can make simple entries here, and Debbie will get back to you for the details!

And now for the second.

If you have educational resources (all audiences) you’d like to recommend to other delegates, help Debbie get them into the Resource Catalog.  Start by seeing if they’re already IN the catalog.  From the Resource Catalog home page,  http://public.eden.lsuagcenter.com/ResourceCatalog , search for your state name. Find your Institution on the left “Filter List.”  For example, the search for Louisiana returns 29 items, of which 28 are for the LSU Institution and one is for Louisiana Sea Grant. Click on your institution name for a list of your institution’s resources.  Send Debbie your catalog suggestions here.

Screenshot 2016-01-12 10.32.45

 

 

What Kinds of Resources is EDEN Looking For?

Access to shared state resources was very high on the list of benefits of EDEN in the recent delegate survey, and the catalog is a primary means of doing that. As you have time, explore the tags, and see how the filters use tags to refine search results. The more you know, the more we’ll grow!

If you’re wondering what resources can be cataloged, here are the resource types:

  • Audio Production
  • Book-Handbook – Manual
  • Course – Curriculum
  • Demo – Showcase Facility
  • Disaster Plan
  • Disaster Report
  • Display – Exhibit – Poster
  • Fact Sheet – Small Brochure
  • Image Collection
  • Memorandum – Agreement
  • News Release
  • Newsletter-Bulletin
  • Presentation Materials
  • Program – Initiative
  • Promotional Items
  • PSA
  • Published Paper – Article
  • Resource – Data Collection
  • Tool – Application (Interactive)
  • Training – Exercise Materials
  • Video Footage
  • Video Production
  • Webinar
  • Website – Blog
  • White Paper
  • Worksheets – Guidebook

Post by Claudette Hanks Reichel, Ed.D., LSU AgCenter Professor, Extension Housing Specialist and Director, LaHouse Resource Center
www.lsuagcenter.com/LaHouse  |  creichel@nullagcenter.lsu.edu  |  (225) 578-2378

healthy homes

With the spreading floods and other disasters, I want to alert EDENites to a set of new, free educational materials from HUD for dealing with damaged homes. These differ from many other materials I’ve seen in that the core thread is “health”, both during and after recovery.

When homes are damaged, disaster survivors face the daunting and dangerous task of clean-up and repairs – often with little or no professional help. All are eager to restore their homes and lives quickly, yet many are not aware of all the hazards that can be worsened by the process.

To alleviate that, various educational resources were recently developed through the U.S. Dept. of HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes working with Cooperative Extension Service and others. They’re now available from www.hud.gov/healthyhomes web site’s Post Disaster Recovery and Resources link under Popular Topics.

The flagship “how-to” guide is Rebuild Healthy Homes: Guide to Post-disaster Restoration for a Safe and Healthy HomeIt’s a detailed, highly-illustrated reference to help homeowners, volunteers and other workers safely restore homes damaged by any type of natural disaster – from floods and storms, to wildfire and earthquakes – to end up with more than just a livable home, but to protect the future wellbeing of their families.

Screenshot 2016-01-08 14.11.51
Content includes the Top 10 Tips; personal protective gear; assessing structural and health hazards; work preparation; best practices for clean-out, gutting, decontamination and repair; ways to “restore for more than before” with resilient, energy-saving and healthy home improvements; and, other resources. Content conforms to new federal interagency recommendations for dealing with mold, lead, asbestos and radon after disasters.

This 72-page guidebook was extensively reviewed and refined by disaster survivors and stakeholders from across the nation, including Extension housing specialists; I was primary author. It’s available as a free online pdf file that can be printed in whole or part, as well as a free mobile app for both iPhone and Android devices (search Rebuild Healthy Homes in the app stores).

Other Disaster Resources

Don’t forget about the app!

Screenshot 2016-01-12 10.56.21


Posted on January 4th, 2016 in Communication, disasters, EDEN Newsletter, Hurricanes

Treye Rice describes how he did it. 

How can you motivate large groups to spread Disaster Preparedness information for you on social media networks such as Twitter? You do it by providing EVERYTHING they need in one, ready-made campaign. In this poster, I visually showcase the ready-made Twitter campaign produced for distribution in Extension coastal districts in Texas. The campaign includes ready-made Tweets, shareable graphics, schedules for distribution, and tracking methods using hashtags and link shorteners. This type of ready-made campaign can easily be duplicated and used as a model for promoting any Extension program, event or resource.

View the campaign materials and how-to video here:
http://texashelp.tamu.edu/using-twitter.php

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