Category: Plant and Crop Security


The November 29, 2012 BBC article “Canadian ‘eco-terrorist’ surrenders in the US” is another example that indicates the agriculture and natural resources industry is at risk of terrorism. Although the BBC reported it as an “eco terrorist,” the accused actions of Rebecca Jeanette Rubin fit the definition of agroterrorism. Rubin is accused of being part of a group linked to arson attacks in the western U.S. from 1996 to 2001.

“The damage to the targets, including forest ranger stations and meat processing plants, ran to more than $40m (£25m).”

Agroterrorism is a relatively new term that was evolving before the September 11, 2001 attacks that focused the American public’s attention toward terrorism.  There are many definitions of agroterrorism, but all generally revolve around this idea from a University of Florida Extension publication:  “Agroterrorism is the deliberate introduction of detrimental agents, biological and otherwise, into the agricultural and food processing system with the intent of causing actual or perceived harm.”

In this view the attacks on ranger stations and meat processing plants fit the definition of an agroterrorism event.

Since 9-11, a great deal has been done to understand, plan for, and respond to potential agroterrorism attacks. The Food and Ag Defense Initiative is a program of USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. This program provides support for the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) and the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) to identify and respond to high risk biological pathogens in the food and agricultural system. The network is used to increase the ability to protect the nation from disease threats by identifying, containing, and minimizing disease threats. The funds also are used to support the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN).

to address local emergency management planning for the food and agriculture sector, EDEN developed a program that has been delivered in more than 20 states called Strengthening Community Agrosecurity Preparedness (S-CAP). This unique training brings together multi-disciplinary teams of local agricultural emergency planning stakeholders to increase capacities within communities to address agricultural issues during an emergency or disaster. To find out more on S-CAP, visit the project’s page on the EDEN website.

– post written by Steve Cain, Purdue University Extension


Drought for Kids
Drought for Kids” from the National Drought Mitigation Center gives an overview of drought – the science, the impacts, and what people can do to prepare for drought.   An excellent resource for students, parents and teachers to learn more about the mitigation of drought, the development of drought, and the impact of drought on producers, communities, and individuals.

 

Kim Cassel


November 16, 2012 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the agency denied the request by several states to grant a waiver of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).  The agency spokesperson indicated no evidence was found to support the claim that producers in particular livestock are being hurt by high corn prices due to the 2012 drought and diversion of corn to the production of ethanol.  The EPA indicated their decision was based on analyses and modeling done in partnership with the US Department of Agriculture and the US Department of Energy.  For more information see the EPA news release.


Kim Cassel


Drought and Red Imported Fire Ants in Found in Hay

Taken from University of Missouri Extension press release, an Ozark County farmer got more than he bargained for when he recently bought hay from Florida,. The hay contained Red Imported Fire Ants (RIFA). In accordance with USDA regulations hay in areas with established populations of RIFA must be inspected and certified prior to shipment out of an area under quarantine.

For more information see Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) alert and the RIFA Community of Practice of eXtension.

 

Kim Cassel


As Seasonal Drought Outlook (below) shows peristence and intensification of the drought over much of the country through the end of the year, I share with you the leadership of  the newly formed Drought NEIL (National EDEN Issue Leader) Team.  The team is charged with the development of  sustainable EDEN and EDEN eXtension drought preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation research based resources.  Working from a Logic Model, we will be building on the excellent resources shared by Extension Specialists and County Extension Educators.

 

University Who Email Phone
South Dakota State University E. Kim Cassel Kim.cassel@nullsdstate.edu 605-696-7873
University of Tennessee Tim Prather tprather@nulltennessee.edu 865-974-7266
University of Kentucky Tom Priddy Priddy@nulluky.edu 859-257-3000 ext 245
Auburn University Virginia Morgan morgamv@nullauburn.edu 334-844-5699
Purdue University Steve Cain cain@nullpurdue.edu 765-494-8410
Louisiana State University Pat Skinner pskinner@nullagcenter.lsu.edu 225-578-2910
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Rick Atterberry ratterbe@nullillinois.edu 217-244-2828
University of Missouri Bev Maltsberger MaltsbergerB@nullmissouri.edu 816-279-1691
University of Minnesota Phyllis Onstad onsta003@nullumn.edu 507-796-6008
University of Missouri Sherry Nelson NelsonS@nullmissouri.edu 573-769-2177
Oregon State University Lynette Black lynette.black@nulloregonstate.edu 541-296-5494
University of Arkansas Deborah Tootle dtootle@nulluaex.edu 501-671-2228
South Dakota State University Alvaro Garcia Alvaro.garcia@nullsdstate.edu 605-688-5488
University of Nebraska – Lincoln Rick Koelsch rkoelsch1@nullunl.edu 402-472-2966
NIFA/USDA Bill Hoffman whoffman@nullNIFA.USDA.GOV 202-401-1112

 

Kim Cassel

 


Posted on August 27th, 2012 in Agrosecurity, Drought, Plant and Crop Security

For centuries, farmers have been using cover crops to prevent soil erosion, improve nutrient cycling, and sustain their soils. However, conditions in 2012 have renewed many growers interest in cover crops to help mitigate the effects of the drought by: 1) Trapping residual nitrogen that went unutilized by the current corn crop; 2) Building organic matter, and 3) Decreasing the risk of soil erosion. Listed below are selected cover crop extension resources, some of which were written in specific response to the 2012 drought:   

Additional drought resources from over 23 state Cooperative Extension Services are available through the Extension Disaster Education Network.